Natera

Chromsomal array testing had a higher diagnostic yield in the study than standard procedures, and could have value as a first step before referring patients to further tests.

The company also plans to submit its Panorama Microdeletion NIPT for US Food and Drug Administration clearance.

The San Carlos, California-based molecular diagnostic company reported total revenue of $45.1 million in Q2, up from $35.8 million in Q2 2014. 

The change makes Anthem one of the first major payors to say that NIPT is medically necessary for the non-high-risk pregnancy population. 

The bank said Natera's SNP-based NIPT technology would give it an advantage as it seeks to gain share in the average-risk pregnancy market. 

The company provided preliminary 2015 revenue guidance of $175 million to $190 million.

The goal is to detect both clonal and subclonal variations and to demonstrate how Natera's technology can help improve cancer patient care and treatment outcomes.

The $180 million offering is well above the firm's initial target for proceeds of $100 million.

The firm said in an SEC document that it plans to offer 6.25 million shares and expects net proceeds of up to $103.3 million.

In addition to offering NIPTs, Natera is eyeing the cancer diagnostics space.

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