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Natera

Natera alleged that certain cell-free DNA-based oncology products sold by Archer Dx infringe its US Patent 10,538,814, which was issued earlier this month.

Exact Sciences CEO Kevin Conroy discussed the firm's pipeline and plans for 2020 and beyond, while NanoString CEO Brad Gray talked about the company's GeoMx digital spatial profiling technology, among other presentations Wednesday.

The patent, which was awarded Jan. 7, covers cell-free DNA-based diagnostic methods, including those used in transplant medicine.

The multi-center registry study aims to measure the clinical impact of serial testing with Signatera in patients with stage II or stage III colorectal cancer.

The magistrate did recommend that the court dismiss two counts made against Natera with respect to trademark disparagement and unfair trade practices.

The index's gain was well above the 13 percent increase of 2018, and almost reached the 39 percent increase it saw in 2017.

Effective Feb. 3, 2020, the donor-derived cell-free DNA test will be covered for all kidney transplant recipients, including those with multiple kidney transplants.

The company expects to launch Signatera for clinical use in colorectal cancer next year and has started to recruit a sales team for the assay.

A preliminary analysis lends some support to covering NIPS for pregnancies beyond high-risk, and some payors have expanded coverage.  

 

The company processed more than 200,000 tests during the quarter, an increase of 20 percent compared to the 167,000 tests it processed in Q3 of last year.

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A Harvard University professor has been charged with making false claims regarding funds he received from China, the New York Times reports.

Discover magazine reports that animal dissections might dissuade students from science careers, but that a firm has developed synthetic frogs for dissections.

Nature News reports that a US panel is reviewing current guidelines for federally funded gain-of-function viral research.

In PNAS this week: de novo mutation patterns among the Amish, an alternative RNA-seq method, and more.