Monsanto

The agricultural company said it will use the licensed technology to develop improved and sustainable crops.

The US Environmental Protection Agency has approved an RNAi-based insecticide, according to the Atlantic.

Under the terms of the deals, Illumina and Monsanto will have access to NRGene's genome assembly and analysis technologies for ag-bio research projects.

CRISPR/Cpf1 can serve as an alternative or even complementary genome editing technology to CRISPR/Cas9, which Monsanto has also licensed from the Broad.

The technology is based on engineered zinc finger DNA-binding proteins, which bind to specific functional domains to create transcription factors capable of activating or repressing target genes.

The ag-bio giant has landed a worldwide, non-exclusive licensing deal for agricultural applications of the genome-editing technology.

The partners will use their respective genome databases, bioinformatics tools, and other resources to identify new proteins for pest control.

The ag-bio giant has also taken an equity position in privately held, Rehovot, Israel-based TargetGene.

The findings further point to the importance of the stability and dosage of RNAi molecules to gene silencing in environmental RNAi-sensitive insects.

The program is part of the company's BioDirect initiative, which relates to the use of topically applied RNAi-based treatments for pest, weed, and disease control in crop plants.

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Researchers report that deleting one gene from butterflies affects their wing coloration patterns, according to the Washington Post.

The Seattle Times writes that pharmacogenomics testing can help choose medications that may work best for people with depression.

In PNAS this week: genome sequencing of weevil symbionts, retinoid X receptor deletion in lung cancer metastasis, and more.

Sequencing could help combat foodborne illnesses, according to a blog post by Food and Drug Administration officials.