Mirina

Notably, the name change comes on the heels of Mirina's failed bid to sue Marina Biotech for trademark infringement due to its similar-sounding name.

A Marina official confirmed that neither company paid compensation to the other under the terms of the settlement.

In making its decision, the court said that Mirinia has “raised only serious questions” on the merits of its trademark infringement claim, and not shown that it would suffer “irreparable harm” if Marina is allowed to continue using its newly acquired moniker.

For instance, Tacere Therapeutics received $488,958 in two grants, the first of which supports development of a new hepatitis C treatment, as well as a previously undisclosed eye-disease program.

Adding to the difficulty in raising funds, there has also been an increase in the number of companies operating in the miRNA space in recent years, many of which are on the lookout for their share of available investment dollars.

Mirina also provided an example in which a big pharma executive initially dismissed a potential partnership with the company after mistaking it for Marina.

In court filings obtained by Gene Silencing News, Marina argued that the two companies' names are sufficiently different that they would not be confused by the savvy and educated players in the RNAi and miRNA spaces.

At the Rodman & Renshaw Healthcare Conference in New York this Week, a company official noted that in work conducted with Mirna Therapeutics, Marina found a 100-fold increase in microRNA in three different tissues, along with downregulation of the intended gene targets.

Mirina argued that Marina's planned foray in 2011 into the microRNA therapeutics space, which is Mirina's core focus, makes a preliminary injunction "necessary and appropriate."

Marina Biotech, formerly MDRNA, said that it changed its name to reflect "the marine nature of our two locations — Puget Sound and Boston Harbor — while preserving our Nasdaq ticker, MRNA."

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An Australian-led team has generated a draft genome assembly of the invasive cane toad in hopes it will help in population control, the Sydney Morning Herald reports.

The New York Times reports that the US Department of Defense has implemented about half the recommendations made to improve safe handling of dangerous agents.

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Stat News reports that Maryland is promoting itself to the biotech industry with a mobile billboard.