Close Menu

Merck KGaA

AmoyDx will develop and seek regulatory approval in China for a lung cancer PCR panel to be used with Merck's MET inhibitor tepotinib.

AmoyDx aims to develop a companion diagnostic for Merck KGaA's non-small cell lung cancer treatment Tepmetko, which was recently approved in Japan.

Metabolon's Precision Metabolomics platform identifies pharmacodynamic, efficacy, and response biomarkers and tracks changes in biological pathways.

The drug, tepotinib, will now be available to treat advanced non-small cell lung cancer patients in Japan with MET exon 14 skipping alterations.

The partners plan to employ Personalis' ImmunoID NeXT platform to investigate biomarkers of response and mechanisms of resistance to cancer therapies.

An IASLC survey showed that molecular testing is not performed in line with expert guidelines, which means only a minority of lung cancer patients are benefitting from precision oncology.

Archer will develop and pursue regulatory approval for a companion diagnostic that will help find patients who may benefit from one of Merck's drug candidates.

Merck will use Definiens' web-based collaboration software platform alongside Definiens' image-analysis technologies for biomarker quantification.

The German drugmaker plans to advance the NSCLC treatment in parallel with tissue-based and liquid biopsy companion assays that can identify best responders.

The reagents involved in the deal improve the specificity and fidelity of PCR reactions.

Pages

Imperial College London researchers are shifting away from testing a COVID-19 vaccine to focus on combating newly emerging SARS-CoV-2 variants, the Independent says.

According to the Associated Press, genetic genealogy has helped law enforcement officials identify an unknown victim of the Green River Killer.

In PNAS this week: target to reduce chemotherapy-induced cardiac injury, tool finds ancient endogenous RNA viruses, and more.

Moderna reports its vaccine is effective against new SARS-CoV-2 strains, though it is also developing a booster, according to the New York Times.