Macrogen

South Korea-based Macrogen has acquired a a non-exclusive research tool license to CRISPR-Cas9 technology.

The company, a spinoff from genomics service provider Macrogen, plans to offer patients an exome test that screens for more than 4,000 rare diseases.

The researchers have generated the most contiguous de novo assembly of a human genome to date and plan to use it as a reference for population sequencing projects.

The companies plan to combine Macrogen's sequencing capabilities with Systems Imagination's analysis tools.

The firm and the cancer center will work together to use genome information-based precision medicine for cancer research.

N-of-One will provide Macrogen with clinical interpretation services for its clinical next-generation sequencing-based cancer panels.

They plan to combine Silicon’s DEPArray digital-sorting technology with Macrogen’s NGS systems to develop genomic tests for different cancers.

The consortium plans to sequence individuals from populations throughout Asia in order to create phased reference genomes for all major Asian ethnic groups.

PacBio's CSP program is a global network of service providers that have been validated to provide sequencing services on the RS II system. 

The South Korean firm will use Genalice MAP for data processing as part of its next-generation sequencing analysis and services.

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