Lundbeck

The study will combine cognitive assessments with genetic data and survey responses to gain insights into the causes of these two mental health conditions.

Dutch gene therapy firm UniQure and academic collaborators have been awarded a three-year grant worth €2.5 million ($3.2 million) from the European Commission to develop a treatment for Huntington’s disease that combines RNAi and gene replacement.

Participating vendors are being asked to build fully functional platforms for next-generation sequence data storage and analysis.

Although Lundbeck's foray into the RNAi drugs scene is modest compared with investments made by other pharmas, it comes at a time when many of those firms have put the brakes on their commitment to the approach.

While a handful of pricey deals have dominated the headlines, a handful of other companies over the past year have formed more modest collaborations to see whether they can take advantage of RNAi as a therapeutic modality.

Lundbeck will use Intomics' data analysis and systems biology expertise and tools to analyze drug development data.

What happens to scientific papers when certain journals are no longer published? Some scientists are trying to make sure they don't disappear forever.

A study in Microbiome finds that heavy drinkers have an unhealthy mix of bacteria in their mouths.

Doctors and patients are still trying to figure out what role at-home genetic testing should play in healthcare, Newsweek says.

In Genome Research this week, mismatch repair deficiency in C. elegans, retracing transcriptions start site evolution in the human genome, and more.