Life Technologies

The university is arguing that the judge had no basis to compel arbitration of what Cornell is claiming is a fraudulent settlement.

Cornell claims that it was fraudulently induced into settling a patent-infringement lawsuit it filed with Life Tech against Illumina.

The company launched in 2013 as a spinout from Boston Children's Hospital to provide genetic diagnostic tests. 

The university's new court documents allege that Life Tech, its co-plaintiff in the previous suit, "fraudulently" induced it to settle the case against Illumina.

Enzo Biochem, Enzo Life Sciences, and Yale University had originally brought the suit against Life Technologies, now part of Thermo Fisher, in 2004.

The Bay Area startup has designed a menu of apps related to sleep, caffeine metabolism, and other indications.

An OpenArray panel designed to simultaneously test for 17 viruses and 13 bacteria and protozoa was able to detect pathogens from human blood donor samples with an accuracy of about 95 percent.

In a recent regulatory filing, Thermo disclosed that it acquired Core Informatics for $94 million and Finesse Solutions for $220 million.

Cornell and Life Technologies sued Illumina in 2010, alleging Illumina's microarray products infringed on eight of their patents. 

The Thermo Fisher subsidiary is not liable to Promega in the US for selling infringing forensic DNA kits in Europe, containing US-manufactured Taq polymerase.

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Lawmakers have asked four direct-to-consumer genetic testing companies to explain their privacy policies and security measures, according to Stat News.

The Trump Administration has proposed a plan to reorganize the federal government, the Washington Post reports.

In Science this week: genetic overlap among many psychiatric disorders, and more.

The Economist writes that an increasing number of scientific journals don't do peer review.