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Protein biomarker firm Applied Proteomics has decided to use multiple-reaction mass spectrometry as the platform for its clinical proteomic tests, John Blume, the company's chief science officer, told ProteoMonitor this week.

Integrated Diagnostics has appointed John Bencich as chief financial officer and Jill Tonachio as vice president for sales.

Caprion Proteome is leading a four-year, C$21 million (US$20.5 million) public-private partnership focused on development and implementation of clinical biomarkers and personalized medicine strategies for oncology.

Executives from several major mass spec vendors presented this week at the JP Morgan Healthcare Conference in San Francisco, offering comments on their company's recent performances and glimpses into their plans moving into 2013.

You might say 2012 was the year that proteomics shed its Rodney Dangerfield routine and began to get some respect.

Researchers from Agilent and SISCAPA Assay Technologies have developed a targeted mass spec workflow that allows for multiple-reaction monitoring-based quantitation of proteins with sample cycle times as short as seven seconds.

While targeted mass spec techniques like multiple-reaction monitoring continue to wrestle with issues of sample preparation, throughput, and sensitivity, recent publications and presentations suggest that the technology has gained a foothold in both industry and academia as a res

Caprion Proteomics aims next year to open a CLIA lab for protein biomarker-based diagnostics, several of which will likely be run on a mass spec platform, a company official told ProteoMonitor this week.

(This story has been updated to correct a description of the company's technology.)
Prognosys Biosciences has developed a cDNA-based system for coding customized peptide libraries and has begun offering it commercially as a research tool.

Integrated Diagnostics this week said it has launched a new operating division called InDi Imaging to commercialize PET imaging probes based on its protein catalyzed capture agent, or PCC, technology.

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Mainichi reports that 43 percent of Japanese individuals said they did not want to eat agricultural products that had been modified using gene-editing tools.

Two US Department of Agriculture research departments are moving to the Kansas City area, according to the Washington Post.

Slate's Jane Hu compares some at-home genetic tests to astrology.

In PLOS this week: analysis of polygenic risk scores for skin cancer, chronic pain GWAS, and more.