Insilicos

The $800,000 is part of a convertible bridge note agreement that could provide Insilico at least $4M in a next funding round, based on certain milestones.

Insilicos, a Seattle-based biomedical software company, is partnering with the University of Washington to market a cloud-based version of the university’s Rosetta protein and molecular modeling software.

The plan, which the agency made public on Jan. 19, detailed a number of draft guidances FDA intends to put out this year; but it's the items that it declined to address, like the development of a new Class IIb device category, that could be the most significant.

Movers & Shakers

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Peter Bergquist, John Fletcher, Lars Utterman, David Weber, Jeff Howbert

The patent follows on one the company received last year for the Erenna platform itself, and comes as it begins efforts to develop the assay as a clinical diagnostic that it hopes to submit for US Food and Drug Administration approval within the next two years.

A number of prominent proteomics-based diagnostics developers were recipients of the grant and tax credit awards, which are being provided by the IRS through the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act's Qualifying Therapeutic Discovery Project Program.

Building on the results of a 38-patient study published in July, the company hopes to develop its PreClue cardiovascular disease biomarker panel as a clinical diagnostic for either screening or treatment-planning purposes.

Bioinformatics Briefs

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Entelos, GlaxoSmithKline, Insilicos, Sciformatix, E&K, EMBL, Genomatix, Fox Chase Cancer Center, BioDiscovery, Roche, Genedata

The $400,000 grant will go to develop a statistical method used for making data-based predictions about diseases.

Funding from the National Institutes of Health for all proteomics-related research shrank by almost 3 percent in fiscal 2008, according to an analysis of NIH data by ProteoMonitor.

The US Food and Drug Administration has new guidelines that enable some gene and cell therapies to undergo expedited review, according to the New York Times.

Using gene drives to control invasive species might be too risky, an initial advocate of the approach says.

Researchers have grown tumors in 3D cell cultures to better understand cancer, the Economist reports.

In Science this week: intellectual property experts argue patent battles such as the one over CRISPR are wasteful, and more.