Illumina

 

Illumina is a developer, manufacturer, and marketer of life science tools and integrated systems for large-scale analysis of genetic variation and function. Illumina has developed a line of products that address the scale of experimentation and breadth of functional analysis to advance disease research, drug development, and the development of molecular tests.

Illumina Facts

 

CEO: Jay Flatley

Website: www.illumina.com

Ticker symbol: ILMN

Headquarters: San Diego, CA

Number of employees: 3,750+ globally

Illumina's NovaSeq accessory, which it plans to launch in Q4, will enable customers to run different experiments and library types in different flow cell lanes.

The company said that it received orders for 135 of its NovaSeq sequencing instrument in the first quarter 2017.

Contrary to Illumina's reports that index switching is rare, the Stanford team found the issue occurred in more than 5 percent of sequence reads.

Cornell and Life Technologies sued Illumina in 2010, alleging Illumina's microarray products infringed on eight of their patents. 

Illumina's partnership with the Human Vaccines Project and Vanderbilt looks to crunch data sets billions of times larger than human genome.

Sync for Genes seeks to leverage HL7 FHIR infrastructure to communicate information from clinical genomic labs in a format for universal use across medicine.

The project aims to sequence the immune repertoires of study participants to spur new vaccine and immunotherapy development. 

The firm can now sell VeriSeq NIPT as a CE-IVD in Europe for trisomies 21, 18, and 13, as well as some sex chromosomal aneuploidies. 

Lucigen has signed a global agreement with Illumina to be the sole distributor of Epicentre Technologies' genomics kits, enzymes, and ancillary reagents.

At the ACMG annual conference in Phoenix last week, several labs and companies discussed their efforts in healthy genome sequencing.

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A fire at a Manchester hospital may have destroyed lab equipment and data, the Guardian reports.

Researchers generate a genetic database from skeletal remains from the 1845 Franklin Expedition to the Arctic, Live Science reports.

Researchers in China have begun another trial using CRISPR/Cas9 approaches in cancer patients, according to the Wall Street Journal.

In Science this week: human DNA found in sediments from archeological sites lacking bones, and more.