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With an initial focus on exosome biology, the technology giant is looking for ways to use the microfluidic chip, which can sort particles as small as 20 nanometers.

The deal, which will help develop personalized cancer treatments for veterans, marks the latest in a series of personalized medicine alliances for IBM.

IBM will install a POWER8-based computing and storage infrastructure, along with advanced analytics and cognitive computing software, at the university.

The partners have implemented Edico's Dragen on one of IBM's Power Systems servers. Edico has also made the Broad Institute's GATK available on Dragen.

Questions remain about how the €6.7 billion ($7.6 billion) pledged for the implementation of the European Open Science Cloud over the next four years will be spent.

The Genome Analysis Toolkit is available on the Google cloud and will be launched on Amazon, Microsoft, and IBM's clouds and BaseSpace later this year.

The new center will help accelerate personalized medicine efforts and support a collaborative research ecosystem in Europe.

The group will offer free access to omic and clinical data from the project and develop software to help clinicians use the models in patient care.

The partners plan to build a comprehensive repository that will contain genomic, exome, and phenotype data collected first from about 200 cancer patients. 

Dozens of government agencies, academic institutions, and a various public and private sector organizations have now committed to driving the initiative forward.

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NPR reports that researchers have developed chimeric embryos as part of work toward growing human organs in animals for organ transplants.

According to the Washington Post, the Biden Administration is set to make changes to federal restrictions on fetal tissue research.

In Science this week: approach to isolated trace DNA from archaic humans from sediments, and more.

Texas Monthly looks into the DNA Zoo being collected by Baylor College of Medicine researchers.