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Horizon Discovery

The Human Protein Atlas was founded in 2003 to map all the human proteins in cells, tissues, and organs using a variety of omics technologies.

The firm saw steady growth in its research reagents and screening businesses, and a 155 percent revenue increase in its bioproduction unit.

Horizon will help develop the cell line-derived reference material, St. George's will provide clinical samples, and the EMQN will run a validation study.

The partners are planning to integrate the technology into Horizon's research tools and services and to develop it for applications in cell therapeutics.

The firm said it saw a robust contribution in the first half of the year from its Dharmacon business and noted that it increased its reach into the US market.

After acquiring Dharmacon, as well as licensing a wide array of editing technologies, Horizon has built itself into a repository of knowledge and tools.

The firm's CEO Kevin Ness said confirmation of MAD7's editing activity in human HEK293T cells shows the potential for Inscripta's technology.

In a note to investors, Cowen analyst Doug Schenkel called the decision "odd," and wondered if there would be more to come.

The company said its product revenues for the year rose 101 percent while its services revenues rose 7 percent.

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