Close Menu

Helixis

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) — Through its acquisition of PCRmax announced last week, Staffordshire, UK-based Bibby Scientific intends to breathe new life into the ECO qPCR system, a low-cost benchtop platform formerly sold by Illumina but discontinued by that company last year.

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) — Bibby Scientific said today that it has acquired PCRmax, a UK-based sales and distribution company set up specifically to capture a significant share of the PCR and qPCR markets.

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) – As part of a larger project aimed at producing a handheld molecular diagnostic for use in the developing world, researchers at Dartmouth have developed an assay to rapidly and reliably detect all subtypes of HIV-1 in plasma samples.

Illumina's brief dalliance with the real-time PCR instrumentation and reagents market is coming to an end.

Illumina President and CEO Jay Flatley said this week that the company has installed nearly 1,000 of its Eco real-time PCR systems since it launched the platform in July 2010 after acquiring biotech firm Helixis.

Applied Biosystems (now Life Technologies) has been awarded US Patent No. 8,036,832, "Automatic threshold setting and baseline determination for real-time PCR."
David Woo, Clinton Lewis, and Nasser M. Abbasi are named as inventors on the patent.

The company also noted that it has received "positive feedback" from customers about the instrument, the Eco real-time PCR system, and will begin scaling up production to meet customer demand.

Illumina has acquired real-time PCR and nucleic acid-analysis firm Helixis for up to $105 million, and has launched a new benchtop PCR instrument developed by Helixis that it said will cost about a quarter the price of existing systems while delivering the same level of performance.

Illumina's revenues rose sharply on rapid uptake of its HiSeq system. The firm also acquired Helixis for up to $105 million, providing it with a new, low-cost, real-time PCR system for genetic analysis.

News from TATAA Biocenter's European qPCR symposium in Göteborg, Sweden, included DiaGenic's PCR-based blood test for Alzheimer's disease and breast cancer; an 'ultrafast, ultracheap' portable real-time PCR system from KIST-Europe; high-resolution melting startup Epilabs from the University of Aarhus and Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre; and Helixis' new thermal cycler.

Pages

Wired reports on how genetic genealogy's use in forensics has exploded in the year since an arrest in the Golden State Killer case was made.

Retraction Watch reports that the increase in retracted papers at a journal is due to more resources there to tackle publication ethics.

New York City has settled with a forensic scientist who was fired after questioning a DNA testing approach used by the medical examiner's office, the New York Times reports.

In Nature this week: technique for measuring replication fork movement, WINTHER trial results, and more.