helix | GenomeWeb

helix

The company has developed a suite of initial products focused on ancestry that will compete with offerings from 23andMe, AncestryDNA, and Family Tree DNA.

Launching a diverse product pipeline will also test Helix's ability to manage the challenges of providing genomics interpretations to a broad consumer audience.

The consumer genomics firm Helix will use an FDA-cleared device from OraSure's subsidiary DNA Genotek for collecting DNA samples from customers. 

The new partners plan to develop apps for Helix's DNA sequencing platform related to ancestry, reproductive health, and food and drink. 

"The idea is to open up a completely new market for bringing genetics into the lower-risk general population," Invitae CEO Randy Scott told GenomeWeb.

The first apps will be for individuals at low risk for inherited forms of cancer and heart disease, and will require a doctor's permission.


Robin Thurston, Helix CEO

Helix plans to launch its first consumer products this year and has a goal of bringing its platform through US Food and Drug Administration clearance. 

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An opinion piece appearing in Newsday likens familial DNA searches to stop-and-frisk policies.

The San people of Africa have drawn up a code of conduct for researchers, according to the Conversation.

In Nature this week: genotypes linked to hip osteoarthritis, and more.