helix

Just Run Faster?

The Verge's Angela Chen tried out a gene test for fitness advice, but didn't learn much new information.

Change Is Hard to Do

Genetic disease risk information doesn't always spur people to make healthy lifestyle changes, according to the Associated Press.

Last month, Helix launched an online marketplace of consumer genomics applications including ones for fitness, ancestry, and disease risk.

With the rollout of Insitome's first app, consumers have the chance to explore their heritage in a new context that could reshape the ancestry testing market.

Among the initial crop of products there may not be a killer app yet, but these first offerings will enable Helix and partners to begin to understand their customer base.

With choice, real-time interpretation, low pricing, and education, Helix believes it may have cracked the formula for integrating genomics into people's daily lives.

Helix customers can purchase apps that interpret different aspects of their genome, Technology Review reports.

The Bay Area startup has designed a menu of apps related to sleep, caffeine metabolism, and other indications.

The company has developed a suite of initial products focused on ancestry that will compete with offerings from 23andMe, AncestryDNA, and Family Tree DNA.

Launching a diverse product pipeline will also test Helix's ability to manage the challenges of providing genomics interpretations to a broad consumer audience.

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The New York Times profiles 23andMe's Anne Wojcicki and describes how she bounced back from a bad year.

Fotis Kafatos, the founding president of the European Research Council, has died, according to the Associated Press.

In PLOS this week: genomic analysis of honeybee disease, microRNA profiles of people with lupus nephritis, and more.

The Verge's Angela Chen tried out a gene test for fitness advice, but didn't learn much new information.