Genoptix

The companion diagnostic test identifies patients taking the Novartis drug Tasigna who are candidates for treatment-free remission monitoring.

The merger, which was previously scuttled and later revived with Rosetta shareholder approval, was due to close on May 27.

Upon completion of the transaction, Rosetta will become a privately held subsidiary of Genoptix and its shares will cease to trade on the Nasdaq.

The deal comes as the firms try — for the second time — to close a merger that had previously failed to gain necessary approval from Rosetta shareholders.

Genoptix's $9 million bid for Rosetta comes just days after the companies' first merger agreement failed to secure shareholder approval.

Genoptix terminated the merger agreement after an insufficient number of Rosetta shareholders voted in favor of the deal.

Genoptix has also agreed to provide a $1.8 million secured bridge loan facility to fund Rosetta’s operations through the closing of the deal.

The technology could analyze, in one assay, all structural variants known to be diagnostic and prognostic for blood cancers, potentially replacing serial FISH testing.

The firms will develop tests in the hematology oncology space where detecting large structural variations of the genome is crucial for accurate diagnoses. 

The business was acquired by two private investment groups and a management group led by Prometheus Laboratories' former CEO.

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Lawmakers have asked four direct-to-consumer genetic testing companies to explain their privacy policies and security measures, according to Stat News.

The Trump Administration has proposed a plan to reorganize the federal government, the Washington Post reports.

In Science this week: genetic overlap among many psychiatric disorders, and more.

The Economist writes that an increasing number of scientific journals don't do peer review.