Genomic Health

Results support the ability of the test to not only identify hormonal therapy non-responders, but to predict their improved survival on chemotherapy.

A new trial has compared the two most prominent tests, showing that both have clear predictive ability, but leaving several other questions unanswered so far.

The study solidified how doctors should interpret and act upon an intermediate result from the breast cancer risk test in how to treat early-stage patients.

In a new analysis of the trial, researchers concluded that women over the age of 50 with recurrence scores below 25 appear to see no added benefit from adjuvant chemo.

Go Small or Go Big?

The Wall Street Journal reports that some researchers are pinning their hopes to small, targeted clinical trials, while others argue large trials are still needed.

The company said it has produced documents in response to the government's civil investigative demand notice.

Test volume and revenues increased in the US, especially in prostate cancer. Meanwhile, international test volume was down but corresponding revenue increased.

Under the draft determination, the test would be covered to help assess which treatments to use in patients with advanced prostate cancer.

The decision, which the company said was made for business and financial reasons, raises questions about the viability of such tests in the face of reimbursement uncertainly.

The company fell short of Wall Street expectations on the top and bottom lines and said it plans on making some significant changes for 2018, including shutting down its liquid biopsy testing. 

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Sometimes genetic tests give inconclusive results and provide little reassurance to patients, the Associated Press reports.

Vox wonders whether gene-editing crops will be viewed similarly as genetically modified organisms of if people will give them a try.

In Science this week: research regulation and reporting requirement reform, and more.

With H3Africa, Charles Rotimi has been working to bolster the representation of African participants and African researchers in genomics, Newsweek reports.