Genalyte

Still Going for Small

Wired reports that diagnostic firms continue to seek, post-Theranos, the ability to diagnose diseases from small amounts of blood.

The company said this week that is has raised $36 million in funding, as it continues efforts to develop its Maverick platform for rapid testing in doctors' offices.

The company said it will use the funds to further refine its Maverick Detection System for rapid blood testing in outpatient settings like doctors' offices.

The company is preparing a clinical study through which it will collect data that it will use to submit the device to FDA for 510(k) clearance next year.

The San Diego diagnostics firm's technology is designed for rapid, multiplexed, blood-based testing in a physician's office setting.

Three collaborators will further explore the clinical usefulness of a TAA panel in early cancer detection and measuring response to cancer immunotherapy.

The test would allow healthcare workers to differentiate Ebola from other diseases that mimic the virus, a trait which presented problems during the recent crisis in West Africa. 

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – The National Cancer Institute has awarded Genalyte a $1 million Small Business Innovation Research grant to develop a biomarker panel to profile tumor antigen-associated antibodies, Genalyte said today.

After announcing last month the release of its type 1 diabetes antigen panel, Genalyte is now planning to develop an expanded version of the research-use assay with collaborators at the University of Colorado's Barbara Davis Diabetes Center.

Biognosys has launched a new spectral library generation service designed to build spectral libraries for use with data-independent acquisition mass spec techniques like SWATH.

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Though many details have yet to be worked out, the draft deal for the UK's withdrawal from the EU is giving researchers some hints for what they can expect, Nature News says.

DNA testing has solved a 100-year-old mystery contained in the skull and teeth samples of a now-extinct monkey that once inhabited Jamaica, Gizmodo reports.

As the UN ponders a ban on gene drives, one malaria researcher says there are less dramatic ways to fight the disease in Africa than unleashing GM mosquitoes on a whole continent.

In Nature this week: an improved reference genome of the Aedes aegypti mosquito, genomes of four species of truffles, and more.