Fluidigm

Fluidigm said that Q3 mass cytometry product revenue more than doubled to $10.3 million from $5.1 million in the year-ago period.

The system can measure dozens of markers at the single-cell level and, one researcher said, could aid studies of cellular heterogeneity in diseases like cancer.

The company gains global distribution rights for the Zurich team's histoCAT cytometry imaging software, which it will sell alongside its newly-launched Hyperion Imaging System.

Under the terms of the deal, Fluidigm has the right to commercialize the CFTR sample prep assay for research use on its Juno automated microfluidic system.

The company announced this week the sale of 9,090,909 shares of common stock, which it expects will raise proceeds of roughly $30 million before expenses.

Revenues for the quarter were $23.9 million compared to $28.2 million the year before, driven largely by a decline in the company's genomics business.

Ascendas will develop and commercialize molecular diagnostic systems and assays using certain of Fluidigm's microfluidic technologies.

The South San Francisco, California-based single-cell biology firm brought in $25.5 million compared to $29.0 million in the first quarter of 2016.

Specialized single-cell "cores" are popping up to help scientists get the most out of new technologies.

The firm's full-year 2016 revenues fell 9 percent, also on lower instrument sales.

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