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Floragenex

Floragenex will operate as a subsidiary of Sedia, and will continue to offer its genomic services and solutions to life scientists.

The deal allows Floragenex to extend its SBG service offerings to include double digest RAD-Seq in non-commercial and academic research across all species.

In a crowded market of genomics service providers, Floragenex has carved out a niche for itself by focusing exclusively on a single technology for marker discovery and genotyping: Restriction-site Associated DNA sequencing, or RAD-seq.

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – Eurofins MWG Operon of Germany and Floragenex of Portland, Ore., will co-market their services for Restriction Site Associated DNA sequencing, or RAD-seq, the companies said today.

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – KeyGene and Floragenex today said that they have agreed to end a legal dispute and have entered into a licensing agreement covering sequence-based genotyping technology.

Under the terms of the agreement, Floragenex has granted a technology license to Illinois Foundation Seeds for genomics technologies for use in corn development.

Floragenex, based in Eugene, Ore., has developed a sequencing-based method called RAD LongRead sequencing that allows researchers to gain SNP information for species whose genomes have not yet been sequenced.

The companies plan to launch a plant breeding offering that combines Floragenex DNA sequencing and marker discovery services with BDI's testing.

Using its restriction-site-associated DNA technology platform, Biota Sciences will provide users with SNP discovery and assay development services, as well as custom genome research capabilities, including the ability to run genome-wide association studies, on their organism of choice.

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