Finnzymes | GenomeWeb

Finnzymes

Acquisitions in the past few years have enriched Thermo Fisher's portfolio of PCR platforms, but the firm says the PikoReal is not being developed for IVD use.

A public-private consortium formed to investigate multi-drug resistance in malaria this week reached the end of a five-year, €2.8 million (about $3.6 million) project having identified a number of genetic markers related to drug resistance and developed a highly sensitive and spe

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The Piko thermal cycler was previously commercially available from Finnzymes, but is now being sold under the Thermo Fisher brand. Meantime, the Arktik thermal cycler is not yet commercially available, but is expected to be by Q4 of this year.

When considering Thermo's planned acquisition of molecular biology tool shop Fermentas, its acquisition earlier this year of Finnish PCR firm Finnzymes, and recent product launches, it appears as if the company plans to make a run at disease diagnostics, food testing, and other PCR-based testing markets.

Thomas Weisel Partners called Thermo Fisher's planned $260 million acquisition of Fermentas a "synergistic tuck-in deal" that "bolsters Thermo's capabilities in the high-growth PCR market."

Financial terms have not been disclosed. Finnzymes provides Thermo with its first PCR instrument platform, as well as proprietary DNA polymerases for amplifying DNA from whole blood, bacteria, and animal and plant tissue.

Thermo completed the acquisition of the Finland-based maker of reagents, consumables, kits, and instruments for molecular biology applications.

The acquisition may also provide Thermo Fisher with a foothold in the rapidly growing PCR-based molecular diagnostics market, according to a company official.

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