Family Tree DNA | GenomeWeb

Family Tree DNA

Living DNA can break down the origins of a customer’s ancestry into 21 distinct regions within Britain alone, as well as across 80 different worldwide populations.

As the number of people genotyped looks set to pass 3 million this year, third-party tools providers have worked to improve usability, add features, and upgrade their servers for scalability.

The site, introduced at the American Society of Human Genetics meeting last week, supports genotyping data generated by 23andMe, AncestryDNA, and FamilyTreeDNA.

The availability of consumer genomics services has also made it possible for adoptees to bypass state adoption laws, many of which restrict access to their records.

23andMe has seen a rebound in its ancestry testing business, and hopes that it will be able to return health information to US customers by the year end.

Thanks to a new array, NatGeo will now offer customers expanded Y chromosome and mtDNA analyses, setting it apart in a competitive consumer genomics market.

Industry observers believe that Y chromosome sequencing services — until now the domain of advanced genetic genealogists and academics — could become more popular.

The company made the move after several media outlets falsely reported that Ancestry had divulged the identify of a donor without a police warrant.

While it may be dominating the market in terms of sales, some industry observers believe that AncestryDNA has work to do before it can challenge the quality of services offered by its rivals.

The value of consumer genomics services is increasing as customers seek to discover new cousins and adoptees track down their biological birth parents.

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