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This article originally ran on May 15 and has been updated to include additional comments from GlaxoSmithKline.
GlaxoSmithKline said today that it has entered an agreement to purchase chemical proteomics firm Cellzome for £61 million ($99 million).

By Adam Bonislawski
University of North Carolina researchers have developed a chemical proteomics approach to measure global kinase activity and used it to investigate drug resistance in triple-negative breast cancer.

The deal marks the first pharma alliance for Evotec since it acquired Kinaxo in mid-April in a deal worth up to $23 million.

Evotec will use its PhosphoScout platform for the discovery of protein phosphorylation biomarkers for use with oncology drugs under development by Roche.

The firms will offer clients access to their complementary drug discovery platforms for identifying and developing new therapeutics for CNS disorders.

Entitled "Proteome-wide quantification of small molecule binding to cellular target proteins," the patent encompasses the company's Cellular Target Profiling, KinAffinity, and Epigenetics Target Profiling services.

Under the deal, which follows on a previous collaboration between the companies entered in 2008, Kinaxo will apply its quantitative phosphoproteomics platform PhosphoScout to assist in drug development.

As part of the deal, Kinaxo will use its PhosphoScout phosphoproteomics technology to assess drugs under development at Takeda.

The acquisition of the chemical proteomics firm allows Evotec it "to take earlier educated decisions on drug efficacy, safety, and response in patients."

In Brief This Week is a Friday column containing news items that our readers may have missed during the week.

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