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Eurofins

The addition of the Y chromosome detection will enable the firm to refine its already-approved MaternalFetalScreen T1 test to provide personalized risk assessment.

The New York Times reports that researchers are working on a forensic DNA test to tell identical twins apart.

Eurofins will distribute Synthego's sgRNA products to its customers in 44 countries.

The test is based on the company's GARD platform for measuring genetic biomarkers of immune reactions to predict chemical sensitivities.

The system combines sample preparation technology capable of amplifying tens of thousands of locations in the genome with next-generation sequencing.

Genoma, which is based in Italy, offers a wide range of specialty diagnostics services with an emphasis on noninvasive prenatal testing, as well as oncology tests. 

An OpenArray panel designed to simultaneously test for 17 viruses and 13 bacteria and protozoa was able to detect pathogens from human blood donor samples with an accuracy of about 95 percent.

The deal will close in July and will expand Eurofins' capabilities in areas including DNA sequencing and genetic testing. 

The deal is expected to expand Eurofin's clinical diagnostic footprint in Europe.

The lab was opened earlier this year as the company's central genomics lab in North America, offering various genomic services such as DNA sequencing.

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Australia will not be regulating gene editing of plants, animals, and human cell lines as long as no new genetic material is incorporated, reports Nature News.

The Washington Post reports that the US Department of Agriculture told its researchers to label peer-reviewed articles as "preliminary" work.

Researchers have sequenced the genomes of both the coast redwood and the giant sequoia, according to the San Francisco Chronicle.

In PNAS this week: study of epigenetic patterns in mammalian eggs, clonal expansion patterns in CD8+ T cells, and more.