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Enzo

The AmpiProbe Candidiasis test identifies five common species of Candida bacteria from a vaginal swab, and is the third test from Enzo to be approved in NY state.

Thermo Fisher Scientific subsidiary Life Technologies will pay Enzo $35 million for infringing on two patents pertaining to labeled nucleotides and nucleic acids.

The company said higher demand for molecular diagnostics spurred a 19 percent increase in its clinical lab revenues.

Agilent will pay Enzo $9 million to settle the suit, which involved a US patent issued to Enzo and describing non-porous solid supports for nucleic acids.

The investment firm had sought to place two candidates on Enzo's board but withdrew its proxy contest after failing to gain ISS's endorsement.

The Enzo shareholder issued an open letter stating its concern about the company's stock performance.

Enzo's fiscal first quarter revenues grew 2 percent year over year to $25.2 million, driven by an 8 percent spike in clinical laboratory services.

It's the first approved test to feature the firm's proprietary AmpiProbe nucleic acid amplification and detection platform.

Affymetrix will pay Enzo $10 million to settle litigation Enzo brought against the company over a method for nucleic acid analysis.

As part of a settlement deal, Siemens will pay Enzo an upfront fee of $9.5 million and potentially up to $5 million in licensing royalties.

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The US has sent its formal notice of withdrawal from the World Health Organization, according to the Wall Street Journal.

Science reports that a draft spending bill would increase the US National Institutes of Health budget by 13 percent.

The Harvard Crimson reports that Harvard and MIT are suing the Department of Homeland Security and ICE over the new international student visa policy.

In Nucleic Acids Research this week: algorithm to determine molecular sequence types and other microbial features, computational method to uncover R-loop structures, and more.