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Enigma Diagnostics

Enigma Diagnostics and GlaxoSmithKline said today that they have signed a supply and commercialization agreement for molecular diagnostic tests for use on Engima's fully automated, sample-to-answer real-time PCR system, breathing new life into a partnership begun in 2009.

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – Enigma Diagnostics said today that it has inked a supply and commercialization agreement with GlaxoSmithKline covering its PCR technologies in Europe, India, Brazil, and Russia.

Enigma coordinated a consortium called Ranger that began in July 2008 under a €3 million grant from the Seventh Framework Programme to develop a rapid, fully automated molecular diagnostic system and test for seasonal influenza strains.

However, the company confirmed that it is no longer commercializing its test, the Enigma ML Influenza A/B detection assay, in partnership with GlaxoSmithKline as was previously reported.

Enigma's testing platform combines fully automated sample extraction with real-time PCR amplification and detection and is designed to achieve results in less than one hour.

The agreement builds upon an existing OEM pact between the companies under which Tecan is manufacturing and will help market Enigma's forthcoming Enigma ML testing device for the point-of-care and low-complexity laboratory markets.

Tecan has licensed molecular diagnostics technology from Enigma Diagnostics.

Roche, Canon, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Enigma Diagnostics, Expression Analytics, Hologic, Samsung, and Fluidigm win US patents.

Enigma said that the patents in question are no longer open to challenge by any entity. However, an official at Biogene who initiated the patent challenge said that the UK IPO's ruling was against him personally and doesn't preclude other entities such as Biogene from re-challenging the patents in question.

People in the News: Mar 4, 2010

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Enigma Diagnostics taps Joel Centeno for regulatory affairs; Adrian Dillon to leave Agilent; Robert Boorstein to direct Enzo Clinical Labs; Denator hires Patrik Bjöörn

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