Eiken Chemical | GenomeWeb

Eiken Chemical

The technology, called LAMP, produces DNA at a single temperature and at higher amounts than can be achieved with PCR-based amplification.

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) — HiberGene Diagnostics said today that it has secured a non-exclusive license to use Eiken Chemical's loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) technology.

Having recently been awarded a key US patent, Irish molecular diagnostics shop HiberGene hopes to commercialize its first assay — a loop-mediated isothermal amplification-based test for meningococcal meningitis — in Europe by the end of this year, CEO Tony Hill told PCR Insid

A pair of recently published peer-reviewed studies has vetted the performance of a new test based on loop-mediated isothermal amplification, or LAMP, as a tool for the quick and easy diagnosis of malaria in both modernized laboratories and in the field in areas of the world where

UK-based molecular diagnostics developer Lumora has partnered with the Foundation for Innovative New Diagnostics to develop a rapid, high-throughput malaria diagnostic assay to screen patients in the developing world.

This article has been updated from a previous version to correct the spelling of Lakshmi Sundaram's name.
By Ben Butkus

The device, available for license from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories Industrial Partnerships Office, integrates a single-tube nucleic acid extraction method with loop-mediated isothermal amplification or reverse transcriptase LAMP.

OptiGene has licensed Eiken's loop-mediated isothermal amplification method to use in nucleic acid amplification reagents for infectious disease testing; while the UK's VLA has licensed the technology for veterinary testing and environmental monitoring.

OptiGene will develop, manufacture, and sell nucleic acid amplification reagents for research use, and VLA will develop, manufacture, and provide testing for nucleic acid diagnostics for veterinary purposes and environmental monitoring.

In Science this week: genetic analysis of pollutant-tolerant fish, and more.

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