Editas

Ready to Go, But?

Technology Review writes that though CRISPR trials in people are beginning, studies in monkeys haven't provided much data.

On the Verge

The Financial Times reports that CRISPR-based biotechs are about to start human studies of gene-editing treatments.

The wide-ranging discussion with witnesses from Stanford, Johns Hopkins, and Editas Medicine touched on recent advances in research and questions of safety.

In letters, CRISPR companies respond to a Nature Methods report of off-target editing effects, Technology Review reports.

The company intends to use part of the proceeds of the offering to advance programs including one in Leber congenital amaurosis 10.

The firm plans to sell 4 million shares of common stock to support preclinical studies and clinical trials of CRISPR-based human therapies, among other uses.

Allergan will have the exclusive rights to license certain of Editas' CRISPR genome editing-based treatments for eye diseases.

The University of California-led party can still appeal the decision from the US Patent and Trademark Office, but it has been dealt a major setback.

The licenses cover IP related to a new CRISPR technology known as Cpf1, advanced forms of Cas9, and additional Cas9-based genome editing technologies.

Editas has paid $1 million to test-drive Adverum's viral vectors in clinical gene editing and $1 million for an option on an exclusive license.

Pages

In an against-all-odds twist, a researcher studying exceeding rare FOXG1 mutations discovers her daughter has the syndrome.

An effort by Genomics Medicine Ireland is creating a database of diseases based on the genomics of people in Ireland. It now is looking into the possibility of including Scotland in its work.

In recent weeks, the direct-to-consumer genetics firm has rolled out a health hub where customers can share information concerning 18 common health conditions.

In PLOS this week, new genes associated with prostate cancer risk, genetic patterns in M. bovis, and more.