DuPont | GenomeWeb


DuPont Pioneer has entered into a collaboration to apply CRISPR genome editing to the development of crop varieties for farmers in developing countries.


DuPont Pioneer researchers used a CRISPR genome editing approach to develop corn that appears to be more drought tolerant.

The firms also renewed distribution agreements for DuPont's BAX System Q7 food safety testing platform in Canada, Australia and New Zealand.

The in vitro assay enabled the scientists to take an uncharacterized Cas9 variant from Brevibacillus laterosporus and edit maize cells with it.

DuPont teams with genome editing firm Caribou Biosciences for agricultural applications of the technology.

The ag-bio giant and the CRISPR research tools company will cross-license patents and collaborate to further develop the genome editing toolkit.

The deal gives DuPont Pioneer exclusive rights to the technology for all commercial applications.

DuPont said the acquisition will boost its in-house microbial discovery programs.

The deal provides VWR exclusive rights to sell the DuPont BAX System Q7 instrument, assays, and related products. 

The assay is now approved for testing composited samples of ground beef.


In Science this week: convergent evolution in bird hemoglobin, and more.

The Wall Street Journal speaks with patients affected by questionable test results from Theranos.

Researchers link variants in TACR3 to hot flashes during menopause, Live Science reports.

Kuwait says it will alter its law requiring citizens and visitors to provide DNA samples, New Scientist reports.