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The companies will join their respective technologies in areas including nucleic acid extraction, library preparation, and PacBio sequencing.

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – DNA Link, a Korean provider of microarrays for forensic analysis, has partnered with researchers at Seoul National University to identify the victims of a massacre that took place more than 60 years ago.

As next-generation genomic tools are increasingly being considered for use in forensics, one Korean company is looking to carve out a niche for itself.

This story has been updated from a previous version posted on Feb. 9 to include additional comments from DNA Link and Affymetrix.
A new array-based test could aid in identifying the remains of thousands of unknown soldiers from the Korean War.

Affymetrix said this week that it has signed an agreement with South Korea's DNA Link granting that company a worldwide license to develop and commercialize a forensic test for comprehensive human identification and other diagnostic tests using Affymetrix's micro

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – South Korean genomics-based biotech firm DNA Link has signed a Powered by Affymetrix Program agreement providing it a worldwide license to develop and commercialize a forensic test using Affy's microarray technology and the South Korea FDA-cleared GeneChip System 300Dx

Korean sequencing service provider DNA Link has ordered 10 Life Technologies' Ion Proton systems, which it will use to expand its clinical sequencing offerings, especially in the area of cancer.

By a GenomeWeb staff reporter
NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – Pacific Biosciences today said that it has signed up a service provider in Asia and a distributor for its PacBio RS system in Korea.

Beijing-based CapitalBio has been certified to offer NimbleGen gene expression, comparative genomic hybridization and copy number variation, and DNA methylation services to Asian customers.

The company will provide sequence capture services using NimbleGen's technology.

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Nature News reports that researchers in Japan hope to soon test the use of reprogrammed stem cells to treat damaged corneas.

A new approach may help limit the number of fish that are mislabeled at markets or restaurants, according to New Scientist.

At Slate, the R Street Institute's Nila Bala discusses the privacy rights of suspects that genetic genealogy approaches in law enforcement bring up.

In PNAS this week: numerous mobile genetic elements contribute to Vibrio cholerae drug resistance, troponin I mutations in sudden infant deaths, and more.