Diaceutics

Analyzing utilization data, Diaceutics found that issues around 13 genetic tests prevent around 78,000 patients from getting personalized, targeted treatments each year.

Diaceutics will use the data to help its pharmaceutical industry clients speed their rollouts of new cancer drugs.

Stakeholder input on FDA's draft Rx/Dx codevelopment guidance signals that precision medicine is actually developed differently than the agency wants it to be.

There was a lot of growth in the precision medicine field in the past year, and some experts believe the FDA's decision to hold off on regulating LDTs could spur more innovation.

This type of test is intended to help guide personalized treatment, but will doctors order it and payors reimburse it if it's not required for the safe and effective use of a drug?

Under the partnership, the companies will help drugmakers efficiently implement complementary and companion tests through lab networks.

Originally published Nov. 10.
NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) – Consulting firm Diaceutics has released a report that shows pharmaceutical companies' readiness to develop and deliver personalized medicines has improved since 2010, at least according to the numbers.

This is the second article in a two-part feature on the state of personalized drug development. The first part, published last week, focused on the scientific challenges facing the industry. This latest piece is about the evolving regulatory and financial environment and recent advances in the field.

This is the first of a two-part feature on the state of personalized drug development. The first part focuses on the scientific challenges facing the industry. The second part discusses the evolving regulatory and financial environment and recent advances in the field.

Peter Kim, former Merck Research Laboratories president, will return to his alma mater Stanford University as a professor of biochemistry at the School of Medicine.

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A phylogenetic analysis indicates two venomous Australian spiders are more closely related than thought, the International Business Times reports.

Technology Review reports that 2017 was the year of consumer genetic testing and that it could spur new analysis companies.

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A new company says it will analyze customers' genes to find them a suitable date, though Smithsonian magazine says the science behind it might be shaky.