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Diaceutics

Diaceutics is projecting that FDA will soon approve more personalized drugs than all-comer drugs, but absent changes in diagnostics strategies many patients won't receive them.

An IASLC survey showed that molecular testing is not performed in line with expert guidelines, which means only a minority of lung cancer patients are benefitting from precision oncology.

The survey results point to the need for greater education among patients so they can better advocate for themselves.

Analyzing utilization data, Diaceutics found that issues around 13 genetic tests prevent around 78,000 patients from getting personalized, targeted treatments each year.

Diaceutics will use the data to help its pharmaceutical industry clients speed their rollouts of new cancer drugs.

Stakeholder input on FDA's draft Rx/Dx codevelopment guidance signals that precision medicine is actually developed differently than the agency wants it to be.

There was a lot of growth in the precision medicine field in the past year, and some experts believe the FDA's decision to hold off on regulating LDTs could spur more innovation.

This type of test is intended to help guide personalized treatment, but will doctors order it and payors reimburse it if it's not required for the safe and effective use of a drug?

Under the partnership, the companies will help drugmakers efficiently implement complementary and companion tests through lab networks.

Originally published Nov. 10.
NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) – Consulting firm Diaceutics has released a report that shows pharmaceutical companies' readiness to develop and deliver personalized medicines has improved since 2010, at least according to the numbers.

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An opinion piece at The Hill criticizes the proposed plan to collect DNA samples from migrants at the US border.

Nature News writes that women in chemistry are less likely to have their manuscripts accepted for publication.

In PNAS this week: tRNA fragment signature for chronic lymphocytic leukemia, genomic sites sensitive to ultraviolet radiation in melanocytes, and more.