DiaCarta

DiaCarta scientists will partner with the University of Florida Health Cancer Center to analyze blood samples from up to 500 cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy.

The deal makes Arrow the sole distributor for the DiaCarta ColoScape test in Italy, San Marino, and Vatican City.

The companies plan to commercialize MIODx's immune sequencing technology for diagnostic purposes.

The financing will support the company as it works to expand its diagnostic products for non-invasive early detection and monitoring of cancers.

The company presented new data from its validation of the PCR-based approach at a conference, citing plans to advance the kit for monitoring and early detection applications.

The test kit runs on standard qPCR platforms in under three hours, and detects 20 cancer-associated biomarkers from four oncogenes. 

The company is working with the University of Florida Health Cancer Center to validate its RadTox QuantiDNA test as a monitor of cfDNA in patient plasma.

The Taiwanese research team that developed the method showed in a new study that it could better detect BRAF mutations than conventional PCR plus Sanger sequencing.

The state of California has given the lab permission to start offering its QClamp test to screen for tumor oncogenic driver and resistance mutations in tumor DNA.

DiaCarta will have the exclusive rights to develop a test for the early detection of colon cancer from stool samples and to commercialize it globally. 

An artificial intelligence-based analysis suggests a third group of ancient hominins likely interbred with human ancestors, according to Popular Mechanics.

In Science this week: reduction in bee phylogenetic diversity, and more.

The New York Times Magazine looks into paleogenomics and how it is revising what's know about human history, but also possibly ignoring lessons learned by archaeologists.

The Economist reports on Synthorx's efforts to use expanded DNA bases they generated to develop a new cancer drug.