CytRx

Galena Biopharma late last month completed its spinout of RNAi drugs subsidiary RXi Pharmaceuticals, ending a year-long saga that included an acquisition, litigation, and a management shakeup that included the loss of RXi's CSO.

CytRx said it sold the shares for $7 million.

Although the suit was first filed last summer, the courtroom showdown had been brewing for years.

The change follows a number of false starts RXi has made in regard to its pipeline, as well as the firm’s failure to meet previously stated partnering goals. But RXi is not alone in this respect, and management changeups in troubled times have been par for the course among RNAi drug shops.

The USPTO said that since the co-assignees of the Tuschl-I IP “have divergent interests, no one side can reasonably expect or be permitted to control the prosecution of [the] patent application [at issue] to the exclusion of the others.”

The court determined that Alnylam and Max Planck have “not shown a substantial likelihood of success” on the merits of their case.

While most companies working in the RNAi drugs field have been able to secure the money needed to maintain operations, a number of players in the space have bowed out under unfavorable circumstances.

In doing so, the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and the University of Massachusetts have all asked that the court reject Alnylam Pharmaceuticals and Max Planck's request for an order blocking any Tuschl-I patent issuance.

Cancer researcher Alan Rabson has died at 92, the New York Times reports.

As the National Guideline Clearinghouse goes dark, the ECRI Institute says it will pick up the slack.

In Genome Research this week: sequencing method examines proteins parasite uses to evade immune system, L1 insertions in cancer, and more.

The Atlantic reports on private Facebook support groups for people who receive unexpected parentage results from direct-to-consumer genetic tests.