CTGT

Connective Tissue Gene Tests (CTGT) has added 21 new assays to its menu of molecular diagnostics for inherited disorders affecting connective tissues.

Connective Tissue Gene Tests (CTGT) has added 12 new assays to its menu of molecular diagnostics for inherited disorders affecting connective tissues.

Connective Tissue Gene Tests, or CTGT, this week announced the availability of 33 new tests using its next-generation sequencing and microarray technologies.

The Association of Biomolecular Resource Facilities has partnered with the Vermont Genetics Network to launch theABRF Core Marketplace, a free service that allows researchers to search for scient

Connective Tissue Gene Tests has released five new tests for mutations, deletions, or duplications in genes related to connective tissue disorders.

Connective Tissue Gene Tests this week introduced high-density targeted array deletion/duplication testing for 10 disorders, adding to 164 disorders for which it already tests.
CTGT now offers array-based testing for the following:

GeneDx has introduced sequencing and array-based testing for mutations in KRIT1, CCM2, and PDCD10, three genes associated with cerebral cavernous malformations.

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CTGT this week launched a number of new tests for autosomal recessive osteogenesis imperfect. CTGT now offers both DNA sequencing and deletion/ duplication tests on its HDT Array for the following OI types and genes:

By Justin Petrone
CombiMatrix is planning to expand its test menu to hasten its growth in the molecular diagnostics market.

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Affymetrix's Gene Profiling Reagents and Gene Profiling Array cGMP U133 P2, Phalanx Biotech's Rice Genome OneArray, CTGT's Connective Tissue Disorders Tests, Anagnostics' Hybcell DoA Saliva plexB-1-01 Array

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A fire at a Manchester hospital may have destroyed lab equipment and data, the Guardian reports.

Researchers generate a genetic database from skeletal remains from the 1845 Franklin Expedition to the Arctic, Live Science reports.

Researchers in China have begun another trial using CRISPR/Cas9 approaches in cancer patients, according to the Wall Street Journal.

In Science this week: human DNA found in sediments from archeological sites lacking bones, and more.