CRISPR Therapeutics

A CRISPR Go

US companies have begun recruiting for a CRISPR-based gene-editing trial to treat β-thalassemia, Stat News reports.

And, Go

The Telegraph reports that UK regulators gave CRISPR Therapeutics the go-ahead for its beta thalassemia clinical trial.

Ready to Go, But?

Technology Review writes that though CRISPR trials in people are beginning, studies in monkeys haven't provided much data.

On the Verge

The Financial Times reports that CRISPR-based biotechs are about to start human studies of gene-editing treatments.

CRISPR Therapeutics is moving toward clinical trials for beta thalassemia and sickle cell disease treatments, according to Wired.

The collaborators have signed a two-year research and license option agreement to develop novel T-cell therapies for cancer using genome editing technology.

The two companies plan to combine their respective gene editing and neoantigen discover technologies in order to develop new T cell therapies for cancer patients.

The firm will use MaxCyte's cell transfection platform to edit hematopoietic stem cells with CRISPR/Cas9 in hemoglobinopathy and SCID.

UC can still salvage its CRISPR IP rights after last week's decision, but a long-shot appeal in federal court is the only possibility for total victory.

The University of California-led party can still appeal the decision from the US Patent and Trademark Office, but it has been dealt a major setback.

Pages

Consulting company McKinsey says diagnostics companies will have to combine genomic data analysis, electronic medical records, effective reimbursement strategies, and regulatory compliance in order to win.

A new report has found that researchers in Africa are still heavily dependent on funding from organizations in the US, Europe, and China, Nature News says.

An article in The Atlantic argues that the progress being made in science isn't keeping pace with the money and time being spent on research.

In Science this week: a CRISPR screen identifies sideroflexin 1 as a requisite component of one-carbon metabolism, and more.