Cray | GenomeWeb

Cray

The supercomputing vendor offers multiple computing, storage, and analytics options that it says will work well for pharma and sequencing centers.

Researchers from the University of Chicago and other institutions have created a computational workflow for sequence alignment, processing, and variant calling that runs on supercomputers, taking advantage of the parallelization capabilities that these systems offer to shorten th

Three life science computers — at MD Anderson Cancer Center, the Genome Science Center at the University of British Columbia, and the Laboratory for Systems Biology and Medicine at the University of Tokyo — beat the 31.1-teraflop benchmark for inclusion in the latest edition of the twice-yearly list.

The University of Chicago received a $7 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to purchase a supercomputer that will be used primarily for basic, translational, and clinical research projects within the university.

A 5,760-core Sun Microsystems blade system at the University of Tokyo's Human Genome Center is the second-fastest life science computer on the latest Top500 list. It follows the 97.1-teraflop, 18,176-core "Chinook" HP cluster at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, which holds the No. 34 spot in the current list.

In Science this week: genetic target for urothelial bladder cancer treatment, and more.

At the Conversation, the University of Oxford's Michael Macklay writes that learning genetic risk of disease is a personal decision.

Two dozen scientific organizations have endorsed the March for Science, according to ScienceInsider.

Researchers in Japan describe a chimpanzee with a chromosomal abnormality similar to human Down syndrome, Mashable reports.