Color Genomics

The latest offering puts the genetic testing company on the path toward becoming what it calls a preventive health service company.

The company has made agreements with two cancer diagnostics firms — GenomeDx, and Cynvenio — bundling its hereditary germline analysis with their somatic tests.

Based on evidence the company submitted on the test, and helped by its low pricing, Color also has preferred provider status with a number of plans.

The company, which has been offering its hereditary cancer risk test at a self-pay rate of around $250, will continue to work with insurers to grow in-network status.

With the $250 service, Color is hoping to broaden access to genetic testing and make it easier for researchers to incorporate genetics in their studies. 

Any short-term gains the bill may have on encouraging healthier lifestyles wouldn’t be worth the crippling effects it could have on the genomics field, leaders in the space said.

The combination test will allow clinicians to analyze breast cancer patients for germline hereditary cancer markers at the same time as they search their blood for driver mutations.

The new assay, called the CellMax-DNA Genetic Cancer Risk Test, will complement CellMax Life's planned slate of liquid biopsy assays for early cancer detection.

The database is intended to provide the research community with a resource of control cases to aid in the evaluation of variants of unknown significance in breast cancer.

Under the Color Family Testing Program, family members of patients who tested positive for a gene on Color's hereditary cancer test can be tested for $50.

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