Color Genomics

With the $250 service, Color is hoping to broaden access to genetic testing and make it easier for researchers to incorporate genetics in their studies. 

Any short-term gains the bill may have on encouraging healthier lifestyles wouldn’t be worth the crippling effects it could have on the genomics field, leaders in the space said.

The combination test will allow clinicians to analyze breast cancer patients for germline hereditary cancer markers at the same time as they search their blood for driver mutations.

The new assay, called the CellMax-DNA Genetic Cancer Risk Test, will complement CellMax Life's planned slate of liquid biopsy assays for early cancer detection.

The database is intended to provide the research community with a resource of control cases to aid in the evaluation of variants of unknown significance in breast cancer.

Under the Color Family Testing Program, family members of patients who tested positive for a gene on Color's hereditary cancer test can be tested for $50.

A year after launching the test in the US, the company is making it available in more than 100 countries, partnering with distributors in Israel, Turkey, and Finland.

Under the terms of the deal, Color Genomics will integrate Kapa Biosystems' library construction reagents into its NGS workflow.

Dozens of government agencies, academic institutions, and a various public and private sector organizations have now committed to driving the initiative forward.

Diatherix and Color Genomics now carry both CLIA certification and CAP accreditation.

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Dog DNA testing finds that some purebreds might not truly be purebreds, Inside Edition reports.

Mary Beckerle has returned as director of the Huntsman Cancer Institute, according to ScienceInsider.

Smithsonian Magazine reports that environmental DNA sampling can be used to track elusive organisms.

In Genome Research this week: repetitive satellite DNA in the fruit fly, transcriptome map assembly pipeline, and more.