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Color Genomics

The companies are collaborating to return actionable genetic information to all participants of the Project Baseline Health Study.

Researchers found that 14 percent of individuals with metastatic breast cancer had risky mutations germline mutations, including patients who did not meet testing criteria.

The US National Institutes of Health's All of Us project awarded $4.6 million to the company Color to develop a genetic counseling resource for the program.

The company will provide counseling in multiple languages and connect people to local healthcare resources so they can use the genetic information they've learned in their own care. 

Color researchers reported that 21.7 percent of individuals with pathogenic variants in well-established genes did not meet guidelines for testing.

By profiling hereditary risk variants in women with breast cancer, researchers hope to lay the foundation for future genetic testing programs in the Caribbean country.

The initiative, funded in partnership with NHGRI and Color, will mentor 40 trainees through a competitive process and host programs to encourage diversity.

A NorthShore University HealthSystem and Color pilot picked up pathogenic variants in nearly 9 percent of unselected individuals with a hereditary cancer gene test.

By focusing too heavily on family history, the Preventive Services Task Force is missing many opportunities for prevention, patient advocates, industry players, and researchers say.  

The article argues that PRS are bad at identifying those who will develop disease but others say this is the same for widely used risk factors.

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In PLOS this week: preconception carrier screening program results, comparative genomics-based analysis of Elizabethkingia meningoseptica, and more.

Canadian regulators are beginning to share information from new drug studies, Undark reports.

Researchers explore a possible genetic cause for some cases of sudden infant death syndrome, KOMO News reports.

In a column at the Dallas Morning News, the Stanley Medical Research Institute's E. Fuller Torrey says the Human Genome Project hasn't delivered on promised results.