Cofactor Genomics

St. Louis-based Cofactor will use the National Cancer Institute's clinical specimens in order to validate its Paragon assay platform.

Researchers who used the company's service presented data this week from analyses of sarcoma patients that they believe can help personalize care.

The financing follows Cofactor's launch of Pinnacle, an RNA-based oncology assay and the company's first product since a strategic refocusing.

The Pinnacle assay for gene fusions and gene expression in tumor samples is the first in Cofactor's new line of clinical RNA-sequencing assays.

The platform will be designed to gather all necessary data from a single RNA extraction, eliminating the need for flow cytometry, genomic sequencing, and expression profiling.

The companies will combine Cofactor's RNA-seq know-how with SII's big data analytics offerings to provide services for pharmaceutical research customers.

The RNA products developer is buying California-based Narus in order to expand into the RNA-based diagnostics market.

The company aims to use the funding to further optimize the technology and support an ongoing early-access program with beta testers.

The firm was named a certified service provider for Agilent's SureSelect Methyl-Seq target enrichment.

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) – Cofactor Genomics said on Thursday it has won a contract from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute and the National Human Genome Research Institute to identify sites of epigenetic modifications that contribute to cardiovascular disease endpoints.

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Senator Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) has released the results of a genetic ancestry analysis, the Boston Globe reports.

Retraction Watch's Ivan Oransky and Adam Marcus report that Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women's Hospital have recommended that more than 30 papers from a former researcher be retracted.

Thomas Steitz, who won the 2009 chemistry Nobel Prize for his ribosome work, has died, the Washington Post reports.

In PLOS this week: mechanisms for genes implicated in coronary artery disease, rumen microbes and host genetics influence cow methane production, and more.