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Caribou Biosciences

CRISPR technology has made its way around the world, but in the wake of the He Jiankui controversy, the industry is asking what recourse it has against misuse.

The two studies describe methods for identifying off-target mutations associated with cell-type-specific SNPs and detecting potential off-target cleavage sites.

The University of California, University of Vienna, and researcher Emmanuelle Charpentier, as well as their commercial partners, are linked by the agreement.

After CRISPR/Cas9 makes a double-strand break in DNA and the cell repairs it, the same set of mutations crop up again and again based on the genomic sequence.

While reimbursement and regulatory issues may make some cautious, investors are encouraged by the promise of breakthrough outcomes in a variety of applications.

Caribou will license its CRISPR technology to Genus to help it create pigs that are resistant to Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus.

The financing round includes new investors Anterra Capital, Heritage Group, Maverick Capital Ventures, and Pontifax AgTech.

The Berkeley, California-based company is aiming to turn CRISPR into a platform technology for clinical and industrial applications.

Fight, Fight, Fight!

The USPTO has become involved in the CRISPR-Cas9 patent dispute.

As the interference proceeding to resolve claims in foundational CRISPR patents draws near, Caribou has given IDT worldwide rights to sell RUO reagents. 

A man has confessed to the rape and murder of developmental biologist Suzanne Eaton, according to the New York Times.

The Irish Times reports that US lawmakers and law enforcement agencies are concerned about ties between the US and Chinese genomics firms.

Parents of children with spinal muscular atrophy tell the Washington Post they are pushing to get insurance coverage of Novartis's Zolgensma.

In PNAS this week: gene mutations in individuals with syndromic craniosynostosis, putative colorectal cancer drivers, and more.