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BioFire

Some tests that detect multiple SARS-CoV-2 genes are serendipitously signaling new viral variants while still effectively detecting infections.

The test, developed by BioMérieux subsidiary BioFire Defense, first received Emergency Use Authorization from the US Food and Drug Administration in March.

BioFire has submitted a 39-target test to the US Food and Drug Administration. OpGen also has a test in development.

The firm saw 120 percent growth in the BioFire FilmArray product line driven by strong demand for a respiratory panel which can detect SARS-CoV-2.

BioFire's test is designed to detect and differentiate between SARS-CoV-2 and other respiratory pathogens, while UMass Medical's test is only for SARS-CoV-2.

Researchers followed a cohort of soldiers deployed to Honduras for signs of gastrointestinal illness and analyzed their gut microbiomes.

The firm expects organic revenue growth of approximately 11 percent at constant exchange rates compared to the second quarter last year.

A handful of recently published trials suggest that use of the pneumonia panel could lead to more targeted therapy delivered more quickly than standard methods.

The panel is designed to detect and differentiate between nucleic acids from SARS-CoV-2 and 20 other viral and bacterial respiratory pathogens.

First quarter revenue growth was driven by "unprecedented demand" for molecular biology products for use in COVID-19 testing.

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The Wall Street Journal reports on gaps in COVID-19 testing affecting less affluent urban areas and rural locations.

According to NBC News, new SARS-CoV-2 variants are making it harder for researchers to model the course of the pandemic.

The New York Times reports that experts say President Joe Biden's goal of vaccinating 1 million people a day in the US in the next 100 days is too low a bar.

In Science this week: single-cell lineage tracing technique applied to study lung cancer metastasis, and more.