Bioclassifier

This story has been updated from a previous version to include information about a competitive offering.
By Justin Petrone

The quintet of studies, presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology annual meeting last week, could help support NanoString's diagnostic ambitions.

ARUP Labs launches PAM50 Breast Cancer Intrinsic Classifier.

NanoString is betting that its test will predict treatment benefit for specific classes of chemotherapies, which will differentiate it from other genomic breast cancer tests on the market.

Bioclassifier has licensed to NanoString the rights to develop in vitro diagnostic and research products based on the so-called PAM50 gene signature and NanoString's nCounter platform. Meantime, ARUP Laboratories will next month launch a laboratory-developed qPCR test based on the signature.

CEO Brad Gray said that the firm intends to have the breast cancer intrinsic subtyping assay on the US market for clinical use in two years.

NanoString licensed a gene signature created and validated by Bioclassifier in order to develop diagnostic and research products for breast cancer intrinsic subtyping.

The Seattle Times writes that pharmacogenomics testing can help choose medications that may work best for people with depression.

Researchers report that deleting one gene from butterflies affects their wing coloration patterns, according to the Washington Post.

In PNAS this week: genome sequencing of weevil symbionts, retinoid X receptor deletion in lung cancer metastasis, and more.

Sequencing could help combat foodborne illnesses, according to a blog post by Food and Drug Administration officials.