Biocius

By Adam Bonislawski
Agilent Technologies and Integrated Diagnostics said this week that they have entered a strategic partnership to develop mass spec workflows for protein biomarker diagnostics.

By Adam Bonislawski
Proteomics in 2011 continued its long, hard slog toward the clinic, battling now-familiar challenges like sluggish test sales, unproven platforms, and the vagaries of the regulatory process.

Movers & Shakers

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Albert Fornace, Amrita Cheema, Dilek Mir, Gregory Critchfield

While Biocius' RapidFire technology has traditionally been used by pharma firms for drug-screening work, "one of the key opportunities" Agilent sees is applying the platform "to the clinical proteomics space," a company official said.

"With this technology and the team that developed it now part of Agilent, we can expand our reach in the pharmaceutical and clinical mass spec markets," an Agilent official said of the Biocius purchase.

The collaboration, which builds on an existing partnership between the two companies, has the potential to improve the drug discovery efficiency of SIRT epigenetic modulating enzymes, which have been implicated in processes such as insulin signaling, apoptosis, and cancer.

The collaboration is expected to result in the launch of a selectivity panel of sirtuins and histone deacetylases.

New Products

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Agilent, Bruker, Biocius, IonSense, NuSep, New England Peptide

The Biotrove mass spectrometry spin-off firm said that the move will expand its lab and product and service capabilities.

The exclusive agreement covers the RapidFire systems and screening.

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Technology Review reports that 2017 was the year of consumer genetic testing and that it could spur new analysis companies.

A phylogenetic analysis indicates two venomous Australian spiders are more closely related than thought, the International Business Times reports.

In Science this week: CRISPR-based approach for recording cellular events, and more.

A new company says it will analyze customers' genes to find them a suitable date, though Smithsonian magazine says the science behind it might be shaky.