Bio-Rad

The Norwegian microbiome-focused clinical diagnostics company has ceded commercialization rights in certain undisclosed territories to Bio-Rad as part of the deal.

The firm reported revenues of $508.7 million, thanks largely to an 18 percent increase in sales from the company's life science segment. 

The deal gives Bio-Rad licensing rights to a PCR-based platform and an assay that improves diagnostic sensitivity and efficacy across four dengue serotypes.

Researchers are using Bio-Rad's droplet digital PCR technology to validate seven ctDNA biomarkers that may predict melanoma recurrence.

The firm's life science sales were driven by increased sales for its Droplet Digital PCR and process chromatography products.

The firm's multi-analyte quality controls for nucleic acid tests are designed to help large and small labs mitigate quality challenges. 

The Olivia Newton-John Cancer Research Institute in Melbourne received accreditation in Australia to perform mutation testing using Bio-Rad's droplet digital PCR.

Life Science segment sales grew 10 percent on a currency-neutral basis, benefiting in part from increased sales of Droplet Digital PCR products.

Bio-Rad reported $570.6 million in revenues in Q4, a 5 percent drop year over year but a 3 percent increase on a currency-neutral basis.

The firms will develop a workflow for single cell genomic analysis using a modified version of Bio-Rad's droplet generator instrument.

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Fotis Kafatos, the founding president of the European Research Council, has died, according to the Associated Press.

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