Bio-Rad

Gencurix's assay can be used to select which non-small cell lung cancer patients will respond to tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

The company acquired GnuBio, which was developing a droplet-based sequencing platform, in 2014 for $39.7 million in cash and $10 million in contingent payments. 

The Index gained 4 percent, outperforming the Dow and the Nasdaq, but underperformed the Nasdaq Biotechnology Index, which rose 5 percent.

Investigators plan to use the method in future longitudinal monitoring studies based on the sensitivity and ease demonstrated in their early experiments.

The PCR-based test can simultaneously detect for the Zika virus, all serotypes of the dengue virus, the chikungunya virus, the West Nile virus, and a host gene. 

The sales decline was largely due to a slowdown in productivity related to the recent launch of the company's global enterprise resource planning system in Western Europe.

Bio-Rad claims that 10x Genomics infringes on patents it holds related to emulsion formation in microfluidics chips. 

Investigators using droplet digital PCR methods are following cell-free tumor DNA in the blood, looking for patterns coinciding with immunotherapy treatment outcomes.

The firm recently released two droplet digital PCR-based assays that can characterize edits generated by CRISPR-Cas9 or other genome editing tools.

The test, which detects DNA methylation markers, is being developed as an alternative to invasive cystoscopy, the current standard of care.

Pages

Using DNA to sketch crime victims might not be a great idea, the NYTimes says.

Science has its own problem with sexual harassment. What do we do with the research these abusers produce, Wired asks.

Senate Republicans led by Senator Rand Paul (R-KY) are trying to change how the government funds basic research, reports ScienceInsider.

In Science this week: combining genomics and ecology to better understand the effects of natural selection on evolution, and more.