BASF

The chemical conglomerate is the second firm to license CRISPR/Cas9 from the Broad after Monsanto.

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) – Roughly two years after it agreed to pay $518 million for Devgen and its portfolio of agricultural RNAi technologies, Syngenta announced this month that it is collaborating with Australian startup Nexgen to develop virus-resistant crop plants through microRNA targeting.

Australian expressed RNAi firm Benitec Biopharma provided an update on its research and development activities late last month, reporting that it remains on track to move its lead drug candidate, the hepatitis C therapy TT-034, into the clinic as early as this month.

Title: Modified Dicer Polypeptide and Methods of Use Thereof
Patent Number: 8,440,430
Filed: March 18, 2009
Lead Inventor: Jennifer Doudna, University of California, Oakland

Title: RNA Sequence-Specific Mediators of RNA Interference
Patent Number: 8,420,391
Filed: Oct. 4, 2010
Lead Inventor: Thomas Tuschl, Max Planck Institute

Medical Diagnostics Laboratories has been awarded US Patent No. 8,206,930, "Compositions and methods for detecting Borrelia afzelii."
Melanie Feola, Martin Adelson, Eli Mordechai, and Lisa Novak are named as inventors on the patent.

Alnylam said that opponents to the patent included Merck subsidiary Sirna Therapeutics, Silence Therapeutics, Pfizer, and BASF.

The collaborators plan to fund research into the genetic and environmental factors affecting yield, quality, and other characteristics of certain grains.

The agreement between BASF, Genomine, and Postech will focus on discovering genes to help maximize yields in staple food and feed crops such as rice and corn.

Researchers are refining a tool to predict a woman's risk of developing breast cancer, according to the Guardian.

According to Stat News, the partial government shutdown in the US could soon affect the ability of the Food and Drug Administration to review new drugs.

In PNAS this week: gypsy moth genome sequenced, phylogenomic analysis of Polyneopterans, and more.

CNN reports that people's genes tend to have a greater influence on their risk of developing disease than their environment, but it varies by phenotype.