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Athena Diagnostics

Williams v Quest/Athena struck a nerve with the genetic testing community by probing what the standard of care is and ought to be for variant classification.  

Athena and its supporters have asked the Supreme Court to clarify patent eligibility, but Mayo recently countered that this is a job for legislators.

The development is a positive for plaintiff Amy Williams, who has said she hopes her lawsuit will spur greater accountability and transparency among genetic testing labs.

Case Continues

The Post and Courier discusses a South Carolina court's decision in the Williams v Quest case.

Though the South Carolina Supreme Court said Quest was a healthcare provider, Williams can try to keep her case alive by arguing she's alleging ordinary negligence.

The court's determination is critical to deciding if Williams v Quest/Athena can advance or if it must be dismissed on statute of repose grounds. 

Attendees at the recent AMP meeting grappled with issues brought to light in a lawsuit regarding the alleged negligent misclassification of a patient's genetic variant.

In Williams v Quest/Athena, a federal district court judge has asked the highest state court to clarify if a genetic testing lab is a licensed healthcare provider.

Judge Margaret Seymour held a hearing to better understand the facts of the case before deciding whether it should go forward.

Experts pointed out the lack of clarity in professional standards and regulations when it comes to dealing with genetic variation in patient care. 

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Politico reports that the NYPD DNA database has grown since it announced it would be removing profiles from it.

Forbes reports that a structural biology lab at Oxford University studying the coronavirus was hacked.

Science reports that a Dutch research funding agency is combating a ransomware attack.

In Science this week: set of 64 haplotype assemblies from 32 individuals, and more.