Athena Diagnostics

Though the South Carolina Supreme Court said Quest was a healthcare provider, Williams can try to keep her case alive by arguing she's alleging ordinary negligence.

The court's determination is critical to deciding if Williams v Quest/Athena can advance or if it must be dismissed on statute of repose grounds. 

Attendees at the recent AMP meeting grappled with issues brought to light in a lawsuit regarding the alleged negligent misclassification of a patient's genetic variant.

In Williams v Quest/Athena, a federal district court judge has asked the highest state court to clarify if a genetic testing lab is a licensed healthcare provider.

Judge Margaret Seymour held a hearing to better understand the facts of the case before deciding whether it should go forward.

Experts pointed out the lack of clarity in professional standards and regulations when it comes to dealing with genetic variation in patient care. 

A high-profile, independent committee is considering the liability issues impacting labs as genetic testing increasingly becomes integrated into patient care.

It is now up to Margaret Seymour, a senior judge in US District Court in the District of South Carolina, whether Williams' case should be dismissed or decided by a jury.

The affidavit from pediatric neurologist Max Wiznitzer is part of a plan by Amy Williams' lawyers to convince the court to take up their client's case.

In response to the plaintiff's amended complaint, Quest and Athena have filed a new motion to dismiss making similar arguments focused on statute of limitations and repose.

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Sometimes genetic tests give inconclusive results and provide little reassurance to patients, the Associated Press reports.

Vox wonders whether gene-editing crops will be viewed similarly as genetically modified organisms of if people will give them a try.

In Science this week: research regulation and reporting requirement reform, and more.

With H3Africa, Charles Rotimi has been working to bolster the representation of African participants and African researchers in genomics, Newsweek reports.