Athena Diagnostics

The court's determination is critical to deciding if Williams v Quest/Athena can advance or if it must be dismissed on statute of repose grounds. 

Attendees at the recent AMP meeting grappled with issues brought to light in a lawsuit regarding the alleged negligent misclassification of a patient's genetic variant.

In Williams v Quest/Athena, a federal district court judge has asked the highest state court to clarify if a genetic testing lab is a licensed healthcare provider.

Judge Margaret Seymour held a hearing to better understand the facts of the case before deciding whether it should go forward.

Experts pointed out the lack of clarity in professional standards and regulations when it comes to dealing with genetic variation in patient care. 

A high-profile, independent committee is considering the liability issues impacting labs as genetic testing increasingly becomes integrated into patient care.

It is now up to Margaret Seymour, a senior judge in US District Court in the District of South Carolina, whether Williams' case should be dismissed or decided by a jury.

The affidavit from pediatric neurologist Max Wiznitzer is part of a plan by Amy Williams' lawyers to convince the court to take up their client's case.

In response to the plaintiff's amended complaint, Quest and Athena have filed a new motion to dismiss making similar arguments focused on statute of limitations and repose.

Williams is within the time frame in which she can sue, her lawyers maintain, since she didn't know about the lab's "mistake" until last year.

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An initiative from GenomeAsia 100K hopes to increase the number of South Asians in genetic research, according to NBC News.

In Science this week: genomic analysis of ancient and modern horses indicates population turnover, and more.