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Arkray

Qiagen has been awarded

The University of Massachusetts has been awarded

Olink of Uppsala, Sweden, has been awarded US Patent No. RE44,265, "Nucleic acid amplification method," a reissue of US Patent No. 7,790,388 of the same name.
Ulf Landegren and Mats Gullberg are named as inventors.

Ibis Biosciences (Abbott) has been awarded US Patent No. 8,407,010, "Methods for rapid forensic analysis of mitochondrial DNA."
Steven Hofstadler, Thomas Hall, David Ecker, Lawrence Blyn, Mark Eshoo, Vivek Samant, and Neill White are named as inventors.

Arkray has been awarded US Patent No. 8,357,516, "Primer set for amplification of UGT1A1 gene, reagent for amplification of UGT1A1 gene containing the same, and the uses thereof."
Mitsuharu Hirai and Satoshi Majima are named as inventors.

Arkray of Kyoto, Japan, has been awarded US Patent No. 8,306,754, "Nucleic acid amplification determining method and nucleic acid amplification determining device."
Kosuke Kubo is named as the inventor.

Canon US Life Sciences has been awarded US Patent No. 8,232,094, "Real-time PCR in micro-channels."
Kenton Hasson, Gregory Dale, and Hiroshi Inoue are named as inventors on the patent.

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill has been awarded US Patent No. 8,148,511, "Methods and compositions for the detection and quantification of E. coli and Enterococcus."

Roche Molecular Systems has been awarded US Patent No. 8,024,132, "Method for the efficiency-corrected real-time quantification of nucleic acids."
Gregor Sagner, Karim Tabiti, Martin Gutekunst, and Richie Soong are named as inventors on the patent.

A Karmagenes researcher has lost his position after reportedly admitting to data fabrication, according to Retraction Watch.

Two neuroscientists write in Nature News that solving the "reproducibility crisis" in science may require changing the requirements for publication.

In Nature this week: genomic analysis of prehistoric New Mexicans, a nanopore method for mapping DNA methylation, and more.

A new study finds that adding missing good bacteria to the skin microbiome of atopic dermatitis patients decreases Staphylococcus aureus colonization.