Ariosa

Streck claims that the blood collection tubes in the Roche Ariosa Harmony kit that Cenata uses infringe its patent.

A jury agreed that Ariosa's noninvasive prenatal test infringed several claims in two patents held by Illumina.

Illumina had filed a series of suits against several companies in the UK starting in 2015, which were recently consolidated into one case.

Several commercial NIPT providers in the US said they are planning to participate in the new program.

Until March 2018, when the patent in question expires, Cenata will have its Harmony test performed by Medirex in Slovakia.

Since April 1, noninvasive prenatal testing, provided by three university genetic centers, is available to all pregnant women in the Netherlands for €175 as part of the TRIDENT-2 study.

The court ordered the molecular diagnostic company to stop offering the Fetalis test it started offering in Germany this summer, which is based on Ariosa's technology.

Roche said it will offer the microarray-based Harmony IVD kit and Ariosa Cell-Free DNA System (AcfS) software to laboratories outside the US.

Last week, the G-BA, a committee that decides about reimbursable medical services in Germany, said it will start a methods evaluation of noninvasive prenatal testing.

United Healthcare, Aetna, Cigna, and Anthem now cover the Harmony test, which predicts fetal risk for trisomies 21, 18, and 13.

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A new study finds that a placental protein linked with preeclampsia can be targeted by RNA silencing, according to the New Scientist.

A settlement is expected in a Duke University lawsuit hinging on using falsified data to win grants, Retraction Watch and Science report.

In PNAS this week: approach for analyzing the expression of endogenous retroviruses, circular RNAs that influence host-virus interactions, and more.

A phylogenetic analysis finds that the rare hemimastigotes form their own supra-kingdom, CBC reports.