Ariosa

Until March 2018, when the patent in question expires, Cenata will have its Harmony test performed by Medirex in Slovakia.

Since April 1, noninvasive prenatal testing, provided by three university genetic centers, is available to all pregnant women in the Netherlands for €175 as part of the TRIDENT-2 study.

The court ordered the molecular diagnostic company to stop offering the Fetalis test it started offering in Germany this summer, which is based on Ariosa's technology.

Roche said it will offer the microarray-based Harmony IVD kit and Ariosa Cell-Free DNA System (AcfS) software to laboratories outside the US.

Last week, the G-BA, a committee that decides about reimbursable medical services in Germany, said it will start a methods evaluation of noninvasive prenatal testing.

United Healthcare, Aetna, Cigna, and Anthem now cover the Harmony test, which predicts fetal risk for trisomies 21, 18, and 13.

St. George's University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, which has been offering NIPT since last year, plans to double its capacity by the third quarter.

The company has sued three companies in the UK and two in Poland alleging they infringed on the firm's non-invasive prenatal testing patents.

Several new laboratories started to offer NIPT locally in 2015, and some providers have been shifting to less-expensive non-NGS platforms. 

The firm's clinical data showed comparable performance between NIPT by microarray and NGS, but the switch to arrays has helped speed turnaround times.

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The Seattle Times writes that pharmacogenomics testing can help choose medications that may work best for people with depression.

Researchers report that deleting one gene from butterflies affects their wing coloration patterns, according to the Washington Post.

In PNAS this week: genome sequencing of weevil symbionts, retinoid X receptor deletion in lung cancer metastasis, and more.

Sequencing could help combat foodborne illnesses, according to a blog post by Food and Drug Administration officials.