The health system hopes to pair the data with nearly three decades worth of electronic health records as well as medical histories provided by contributors.

Researchers constructed family trees with up to 13 million members from public genealogy profiles, but some disagree with their conclusions on the genetics of longevity.

American customers' interest in their genetic ancestry continues to be the primary driver of the consumer genomics market and shows no signs of diminishing. 

Kits as Gifts

Wired reports that AncestryDNA sold 1.5 million genetic testing kits this Black Friday.

New York Senator Charles Schumer cautions that genetic testing companies could sell consumers' genetic data, the New York Post reports.

With the rollout of Insitome's first app, consumers have the chance to explore their heritage in a new context that could reshape the ancestry testing market.

The Bay Area startup has designed a menu of apps related to sleep, caffeine metabolism, and other indications.

Forever, Ever tells BBC News that it is changing its terms of service after criticism.

Researchers found that direct-to-consumer genetic testing customers' primary motivation to share their genomic data was not to gain health specific knowledge.

The company has developed a suite of initial products focused on ancestry that will compete with offerings from 23andMe, AncestryDNA, and Family Tree DNA.


An opinion piece in the Guardian argues that President Donald Trump is uninterested in science and that might not be a bad thing for the field.

The San Francisco Chronicle reports the Veterans Affairs Health System is studying whether genetic testing can help prescribe better depression therapies.

Stat News reports that Spark Therapeutics' Luxturna is now being used to treat a wider array of patients.

In Genome Biology this week: transcription factor use among brittle stars, single-cell RNA sequencing strategy, and more.