Ancestry.com | GenomeWeb

Ancestry.com

Living DNA can break down the origins of a customer’s ancestry into 21 distinct regions within Britain alone, as well as across 80 different worldwide populations.

A recent study examining the websites of 30 DTC genomics firms found that many do not follow international recommendations for disclosing information to customers.

AncestryDNA, a unit of Ancestry.com, analyzes DNA samples to identify and quantify customers' ethnic origins.

Only 5 percent of respondents said they got tested through a consumer genomics firm, but the future market could be worth as much as $7 billion, analysts at UBS estimated.

In a trademark case, a federal court judge has found that DNA Diagnostics Center was using the term "ancestry" prior to Ancestry.com's entrance into testing.

The company said the investments will support growth in its AncestryDNA genetic genealogy offering.

Consumer genetics companies field law enforcement requests, the Associated Press reports.

As the number of people genotyped looks set to pass 3 million this year, third-party tools providers have worked to improve usability, add features, and upgrade their servers for scalability.

The site, introduced at the American Society of Human Genetics meeting last week, supports genotyping data generated by 23andMe, AncestryDNA, and FamilyTreeDNA.

Ancestry.com is eyeing an expansion into genomic risk assessments, the Verge reports.

Pages

In Science this week: deletion of one microRNA allows pluripotent stem cells to form embryonic and non-embryonic lineages, and more.

Arizona is planning to sue Theranos for "deceptive acts" and misrepresentations of its "capabilities and operation."

If confirmed as Department of Health and Human Services Secretary, Tom Price says he will divest himself of certain holdings, according to Stat News.

Oliver Smithies, who won the Nobel Prize in 2007, has died, the New York Times reports.