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Ancestry.com

A Different Future

In his look back at the past decade, BuzzFeed News' Peter Aldhous writes that direct-to-consumer genetic testing has led to "Facebook for genes."

The clinical decision support content developer is integrating genetic testing information into its knowledgebase to assist physicians at the point of care.

The educational grant will support UpToDate's development of technology to help medical professionals advise their patients on health implications of genetic tests.

The company launched a "core" service using Illumina microarray genotyping, and has plans for an expanded NGS offering with Quest Diagnostics.

23andMe had sued Ancestry.com for, among other things, infringing a patent related to a method for determining the degree to which two people in a database are related.

New Privacy Coalition

Three genetic testing companies form a coalition to influence how Congress considers genetic privacy, The Hill reports.

NatGeo will continue to conduct research using its database, which includes data on roughly a million individuals.

The Israeli online genealogy company recently expanded its ancestry genetic testing offering to include health information.

Consumer genomics companies have endeavored to reach out to minority communities with sometimes contentious results.

 At-home genetic tests can uncover family secrets and lead those who uncover them to seek out support groups, the Boston Globe reports.

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ScienceInsider reports that rude and unprofessional paper reviewers are common and can have harmful effects.

The US Senate has confirmed Stephen Hahn as the next commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration, according to the New York Times.

CNBC reports Apple is partnering with Color Genomics to offer its employees free DNA screening for disease.

In Science this week: researchers use CRISPR tool to find gut microbiome molecules involved in immunity, and more.